“A House In The Sky”

It was on that night that Moussa followed Samba and his siblings, Rooka and Ziko, to the football court. When Samba saw him, he tried to hide the food, but Moussahad already seen it. He grabbed Samba by his shirt and slapped his face. “You dirty pig,” he snarled. “I spend every pound I earn on your sick mother’s medicine and feeding your brother and sister, and here you are enjoying your time eating and drinking.”
He stuffed his hands inside Samba’s pockets, searching for his money before Samba kneed him in the groin.

Samba quickly grabbed his knife from his pocket. Pointing the steely blade at Moussa, he screamed: “If you come one step closer to me or my brother and sister, I swear I will kill you!” Bent over in anger and pain, Moussa looked up at him and his siblings. He slowly stood tall, paused, and spat on them. As he turned and walked back to his house, he shouted: “Don’t you dare come near the house again! If you do – I’ll cut off your legs!”

Rooka and Ziko sobbed uncontrollably as Samba slowly wrapped his arms around them, hugging them tightly. They couldn’t eat that night. Instead, they climbed up to the rooftop of the abandoned school. It was a little windy, so they lay on the ground beside each other and gazed up at the stars. Rooka pointed up towards the sky, “Do you see that house over there?” “Where?” Ziko asked.“That one next to the moon,” Rooka answered back. “The one with the garden and the big tree. I have an idea, we can live there. We can take a plane and go up in the sky and live there. Moussa won’t be able to reach us.” She looked back to Samba, but he had fallen into a deep sleep, with his fist clenched tightly around his small knife.


About the author:

Mirette Bahgat is an emerging Egyptian short story author, blogger, and a humanitarian worker. Her work has appeared in Bahati short story collection; The Huffington Post; Arab Spring Dreams: The Next Generation Speaks out for Freedom and Justice. Her writing explores issues of self-identity, spirituality, mythologies and gender.

Mirette Bahgat