God and Mammon Go to the Movies

The conflict between the competing demands of the market economy and religion is unmistakable in three much lauded films of the last decade, There Will Be BloodHail, Caesar!, and The Birth of a Nation, in which characters negotiate the underlying contradictions between a get-rich-quick economy and a money-is-the-root-of-all-evil faith.

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Ken Hines
Zadie Smith and M. Nourbese Philip: Narratives And Mythologies On Identity, Gender, And Language

Contemporary postcolonial literature is a wide and fruitful field of writing which engages in discourses of cultural identity. Often, these discourses are associated to other themes, such as language and gender. How do Zadie Smith and M. Nourbese Philip, two extraordinary contemporary women writers, position themselves in this field?

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J. G. Ballard's The Atrocity Exhibition and Trauma Narrative

The way in which The Atrocity Exhibition captures the reality of the 1960s is not objective, but radically distorted and based on trauma. This reflection of cultural trauma is particularly powerful because basic elements of trauma narrative, especially fragmentation, are also identified as being part of the source of the trauma.

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Frank-and-time: Truths of Science in Frankenstein and Penny Dreadful

Mary Shelley's monster from Frankenstein has been taken and adapted many times. This time, we focus on the adaption which plays a role in the gothic TV series Penny Dreadful. By comparing the two, what is revealed about the way in which science and humanity relate to each other?

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The Wolf and the Feminist: A Critical Reading of Angela Carter's Wolf Trilogy

Angela Carter’s Wolf Trilogy attempts to present its readers with strong female protagonists who use fearlessness or sexuality to remain free from patriarchal dominance. However, Carter ends up undermining  her feminist purpose in the way she portrays her protagonists.

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Popular Feminism and the Problem of Choice

Choice feminism, a school of thought which believes that any choice made by a woman, of her own accord, is inherently a feminist choice and that one should be accepting of others, their choices and not judge them. This is based on the idea that we live in a post feminist world and to make the movement broadband, it should follow a sort of a common minimum program. This is one of the internal contradictions that choice feminism entails.

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Identity and Transcendence in William Gibson's​ Neuromancer

William Gibson’s Neuromancer explores transcendence in its depiction of  Case and cyberspace. Case finds his identity in cyberspace, and his desire to transcend his body is rooted in a desire to escape what he deems to be a flesh prison. How does the novel explore the theme of escapism in relation to a desire to transcend the human body?

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How to Get Away with Murder: Moral Nihilism in The Spy Who Came In From The Cold

John Le Carré’s world of Cold War espionage, according to some, depicts a straightforward structure on its surface level: “there were good guys and bad guys and they were easy to spot” (Boyd). How does the depiction of morality and its subjectivity in The Spy Who Came in from the Cold instead paint a picture where the spotting of good guys and bad guys is not so straightforward? 

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LiteratureManou Jonink
Bob Dylan and the Paradoxical Tradition of Antiestablishment Art

Dylan's still recent Nobel win reminds us one of the most interesting aspects of his popularity through the decades: the way he was embraced by the mechanisms of the very system he rebelled against. What was Bob Dylan’s pivotal role in shaping the popular culture of the sixties through his ever changing political stance and his obsessive tinkering with his own public image?

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The Personal, the Political, and the Academic: Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts

Kneading together memoir, academic writing, and social criticism, Maggie Nelson gives a new meaning to "The personal is political." How does Nelson use her experience to present social issues, and how does Deleuze's perception of phenomenology play a part in this? 

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Isolation and References in T.S. Eliot's Poems

How does T.S. Eliot use various literary references to construct the voices in “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” and “The Hollow Men” to highlight the themes of isolation and miscommunication in the two poems?

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WHAT MAKES A BOOK SCOTTISH: ON CALEDONIAN ANTISYZYGY AND NOSTALGIA

When discussing Scottish literature, a familiar point of discussion is determining what element makes it Scottish, distinguishing it from other countries’ literature. Along with the theme of national identity, Gregory Smith’s idea of a Caledonian antisyzygy will inevitably come up.

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HEART OF DARKNESS: A POSTMODERN READING

Marlow, the protagonist of the novel, seems to make his way through perceptions and representations of reality, which he builds in what could be said to be, from a postmodernist point of view, a modernist approach and which he transcends in what could be said to be a postmodernist approach.

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Elisa Sabbadin
I WANTED TO KNOW WHAT 'IT' MEANT: JACK KEROUAC'S SEARCH FOR LIFE ON THE ROAD

Kerouac’s breathless run towards a non-identifiable destination, entwined with alcohol, drugs and sexual promiscuity and recounted in On the Road has sometimes been seen as an escape or a self-contradictory way to avoid reality, but is in truth an authentic and spiritual search in life and for life.

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