BOOK REVIEW: THE TRAVELLING COMPANION by IAN RANKIN

The Travelling Companion is a novella by Ian Rankin, who is mostly known for his crime novels featuring his hero, Inspector John Rebus. This novella however is not quite in the same vein. It contains elements from Rankins distinct style of crime/mystery writing, but it is much more contained. Would recommend The Travelling Companion for, well, travelling!

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BOOK REVIEW: THE SECRET HISTORY BY DONNA TARTT

The Secret History is Donna Tartt's debut novel, and it has now gained the status of a modern classic. Focusing on the lives of a group of privileged students and their eccentric and manipulative Classics professor, The Secret History is a study in morality, aesthetics, and intellectual vanity.

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BOOK REVIEW: GODSGRAVE BY JAY KRISTOFF

Godsgrave continues the thrill Kristoff set up in his 2016 novel Nevernight. The novel follows teenage assassin Mia Corvere as she further develops her plot to avenge the death of her parents. The sequel proves to be somewhat different from the original in terms of tone and setting, but is still true to the distinct voice that emerged from Nevernight.

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BOOK REVIEW: WINTER SMITH - THE SECRETS OF FRANCE BY J.S. STRANGE

In the sequel to his 2016 YA zombie novel Winter Smith: London’s Burning, Strange has once again shown talent for balancing a plot-driven narrative with character development. Does Winter Smith: The Secrets of France meet expectations for anyone who has read Strange’s debut novel?

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BOOK REVIEW: NEVERNIGHT BY JAY KRISTOFF

The fantasy novel Nevernight is the first in a series by Kristoff, about Mia Corvere, a girl born and raised in the highest social class in the Itreyan Republic’s capital, Godsgrave. After her family is torn apart by certain people in the government, Mia's best chance at revenge is training at the Red Church, a school that produces the best assassins in the world.

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BOOK REVIEW: THE JILTED BRIDE BY KRISTEN REED

The Jilted Bride expands on the mythology of Cinderella, and is in essence a retelling of a well-known story which draws on folklore and Christian values. This leaves us only one question: do the strong hints of feminist writing succeed in making this novel anything more than a simple Cinderella retelling?

 

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BOOK REVIEW: WINTER SMITH – LONDON'S BURNING BY J.S. STRANGE

Winter Smith: London’s Burning is a young adult zombie novel, and accordingly gives us a fast paced story which includes zombies that are among the scariest in literature. Apart from the popularity of anything zombie-related, how does J.S. Strange in his novel offer substance to the regular YA reader?

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BOOK REVIEW: THE CROW GIRL BY ERIK AXL SUND

Finally available in English, this edition contains all three books of Sund’s Victoria Bergman Trilogy. After reading this book, some seem to think ‘Move over, Hannibal and The Millennium Trilogy!’ This book achieves everything you might expect from a crime novel and even takes things further than you might be able to handle.

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BOOK REVIEW: THE HOTEL OF THE THREE ROSES BY AUGUSTO DE ANGELIS

Augusto De Angelis: one of the greatest Italian writers in the detective genre. Read how a grotesque murder in The Hotel of the Three Roses is not only the start of a series of mysterious and shady events in the hotel, but also of the intriguing plot of an absolute page turner that is this masterfully crafted whodunit.

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BOOK REVIEW: THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY BY OSCAR WILDE

Dorian Gray is a rich, handsome, complete gentleman, who experiences a whole new world of ideas, pleasures and possibilities when he meets Lord Henry. In the theme of Faust, does The Picture of Dorian Gray succeed in serving as a mirror when it comes to questions every human has to answer for themselves?

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BOOK REVIEW: OUR ENDLESS NUMBERED DAYS BY CLAIRE FULLER

Eight year old Peggy is taken to a run-down cabin in the middle of a German forest, where her father tells her that everyone she ever knew is now dead. Fuller takes the time to immerse the reader in the setting, both physical and emotional, which is the greatest strength of this terrifying and deeply moving story.

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BOOK REVIEW: A GIRL IS A HALF-FORMED THING BY EIMEAR MCBRIDE

The narrator of the novel is a young girl whose brother has brain cancer. Her relationship with her brother and family, and the effect her brother’s illness had on her, is explored through a thought-driven narrative. What can this novel's style say about narrative tendencies in 21st century novels?

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BOOK REVIEW: DANCE DANCE DANCE BY HARUKI MURAKAMI

The sixth novel by Haruki Murakami, and the sequel to A Wild Sheep Case, Dance Dance Dance deals with motifs and symbols which are not unknown to anyone who is familiar with the author. What does the immersion of the protagonist in the dark core of his being have to offer to anyone who is familiar with Murakami?

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