Book Review: Bindlestiff by Wayne Holloway

Bindlestiff presents a post-apocalyptic-looking landscape that has seen the disintegration of the federal system and of the internet, along with the socio-economic structures that held the country together. But this post-apocalyptic image is just that – an image conjured by a script written by @waynex in the process of getting the Hollywood treatment.

Read More
Book Review: The Governesses by Anne Serre

In The Governesses, Anne Serre builds an enchanted, magic atmosphere where everything happens in the shadows. She employs language and imagery that bring the fairytale staples back to their dark, sexually-charged roots while at the same time exploring masculinity and gender dynamics through a feminist lens.

Read More
Platon Poulas
Book Review: Animalia by Jean-Baptiste Del Amo

From the very first pages, Animalia establishes itself as a text that demands attention and rewards it with visceral prose that doesn’t simply create a world, but becomes part of its very fabric. It’s dense in a way that every page holds its own weight. The action is focused on movements rather than events – the routine is settled early on, and every activity in the characters’ lives is simultaneously mundane and vital.

Read More
Platon Poulas
Book Review: Rilke in Paris by R.M. Rilke & Maurice Betz

Rilke went to Paris in 1902 to write a monograph on acclaimed sculptor Auguste Rodin. This was only the beginning of his love affair with Paris, a city which he would leave and return to again several times between his first visit and his death in Switzerland in 1926. Rilke in Paris is the combination of his own reflections on Paris and the observations of his French translator, Maurice Betz.

Read More
Platon Poulas
Book Review: I Want To Show You More by Jamie Quatro

In these stories, Jamie Quatro’s blend of intimacy and a sense of faith in the divine is ever-present in the prose and dialogue. But, more than faith, the defining quality of these characters is a sense of devotion – not necessarily to something holy by definition, but to something deeply personal to them.

Read More
Platon Poulas
Book Review: Happening by Annie Ernaux

Anyone who picked up The Years last year does not need to be convinced that Happening is a memoir of the highest calibre by an author who writes with such honesty and precision about the most personal of stories. Annie Ernaux offers a glimpse into a difficult and lonely period of her life as “something intelligible and universal, causing my existence to merge into the lives and heads of other people.”

Read More
Platon Poulas
Book Review: Mothlight by Adam Scovell

Adam Scovell’s debut novel Mothlight is a first-person introspective journey of understanding how a personal identity is informed and shaped by other people. A novel written with the style and sensibility of a literary memoir, it is as much an exercise in self-exploration as it is an exercise in memory.

Read More
Platon Poulas
Book Review: No Place to Lay One’s Head by Françoise Frenkel

Françoise Frenkel’s No Place to Lay One’s Head, translated into English by Stephanie Smee, certainly is a remarkable discovery: harrowing and beautifully written, it is both an astonishing historical account of surviving the horrors of the Second World War and a timeless story about the importance of empathy and resilience in the most difficult times.

Read More
Alice Piotrowska
Book Review: Childhood by Gerard Reve

Following Pushkin Press’s 2016 release of The Evenings, Dutch writer Gerard Reve returns in English with Childhood, which includes two of his early novellas, Werther Nieland and The Fall of the Boslowits Family. Both embody the best of Reve’s writing: dark wit, strange characters, and brilliant style that make this book a delightful and mesmerising read.

Read More
Alice Piotrowska
Book Review: Soul of the Border by Matteo Righetto

Matteo Righetto’s Soul of the Border is an fascinating mix of adventure and historical fiction that focuses on the life of a tobacco-growing family during the late 19th century in the Veneto region of Italy. The hard farming life of the de Boer family reflects the wider trials which the working class of the region faced in order to survive during that period.

Read More
Platon Poulas
Book Review: Limbo by Dan Fox

Dan Fox’s new book came as a result of writer’s block, a period marked by failed attempts to write a collection of travel essays. Instead, he focused on this phenomenon of creative stagnancy and wrote about his introspective analysis. The result is Limbo, a long essay that considers a multitude of domains, physical and metaphysical, in which agency is removed and time takes on unfathomable qualities.

Read More
Book Review: Drive Your Plow by Olga Tokarczuk

After the success of Man Booker International Prize Winner Flights, Fitzcarraldo Editions return with a new Olga Tokarczuk novel. Originally published in Poland in 2009, Drive Your Plow Over The Bones Of The Dead was translated into English by Antonia Lloyd-Jones. Far from the “constellation-novel” form of Flights that Tokarczuk opts for in many of her later works, it presents itself as a reinvention of the gothic noir and crime novel.

Read More
Book Review: My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh

After having graduated in art history from Columbia and quitting her job at a pretentious art gallery, the unnamed narrator of My Year of Rest and Relaxation retires in her Upper East Side apartment and resolves to sleep for the coming year, at the end of which she expects to emerge a different person.

Read More